Cool Trick.ly for Protecting Internet Privacy

Reading Seth Godin’s blog, his Sort of private post introduced me to a new service that helps provide a little privacy to things we want to share with people on the Internet.

Like bit.ly and tiny.url, Trick.ly is a new service that shortens a URL but instead of being open to anyone to access, you can password protect it.  People can only see where the link goes when they know how to answer your made up (case sensitive)  “secret” question/clue.

So for example, let’s say I only wanted my customers to access “Check out the new new features in our latest product release…http://trick.ly/39D ”  I would set up the password and clue to be something only my customers could answer. As a marketer, there are some interesting use cases provided your audience enjoys riddles.  But as a consumer, there are many good use cases for sharing information with groups while keeping unwanted eyes from it (think pictures of your kids..summer vacation..last weekend’s margarita party…)

A further look into Trick.ly and it seems the service launched earlier this month.  The first blog post was on May 3 and discusses why the service came about:

Casual Privacy for the web.

How many times have you heard someone say “Hey, can I get a little privacy here???”

As funny as it may sound, often times that’s all we really want: “a little” privacy.  We don’t care if it’s secure enough to keep the NSA out, we just prefer that:

1. The stalkers move along.
2. Strangers can’t look at our anaytics or “stumble on” it.

We wanted to create an easy-to-use security system for tribes.

No need to sign your whole friendlist up so they can view the link — for that matter, you don’t need to sign up either.

Of course, we all need to be careful to not confuse private with secure.  While Trick.ly does help provide some privacy around access, you should always remember whatever information you are sharing behind a Trick.ly URL is still on the Internet.

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